volcainist
plantlova:

k-aff:

ancient-lights:

This is so cool. You normally only see lightning for a split second and it’s gone, but since this is looped, we see the beauty over and over

The more you look at it the cooler it is


it’s so weird how the first time you watch this it feels like the dark sky appears for at least three seconds but after the second or third time it’s like the black is there for 0.5 seconds. odd.

plantlova:

k-aff:

ancient-lights:

This is so cool. You normally only see lightning for a split second and it’s gone, but since this is looped, we see the beauty over and over

The more you look at it the cooler it is

it’s so weird how the first time you watch this it feels like the dark sky appears for at least three seconds but after the second or third time it’s like the black is there for 0.5 seconds. odd.

todaysdocument
todaysdocument:

Happy 115th Birthday, Ernest Hemingway!
Author Ernest Hemingway enjoys a drink with other war correspondents on the island of Mont St. Michel, off northern France, in the summer of 1944.  Born on July 21, 1899, the author would have likely celebrated his 45th birthday a few weeks before this scene.

Excerpted from: D-Day to Germany, 1944
From the series: Motion Picture Films Relating to the Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) and Commemorative Visits After the War, compiled 1944 - 1969. Collection LIEB: Jack Lieb Collection, 1944 - 1969

Taken by newsreel cameraman Jack Lieb, this color home movie was donated by the Lieb family to the National Archives in 1984. You’ll see D-Day from a perspective different than the official military film or commercial newsreel. With his personal footage, Lieb takes the viewer through the preparations in England, where he spent time with war correspondents Ernie Pyle, Jack Thompson, and Larry LaSueur, to the liberation of Paris and finally into Germany. Along the way, Lieb captured his experience on 16mm Kodachrome, filming everyday people in France and the occasional celebrity, such as Edward G. Robinson or Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway shows up around 26:45.)


Via The Unwritten Record » A Newsreel Cameraman’s View of D-Day

todaysdocument:

Happy 115th Birthday, Ernest Hemingway!

Author Ernest Hemingway enjoys a drink with other war correspondents on the island of Mont St. Michel, off northern France, in the summer of 1944.  Born on July 21, 1899, the author would have likely celebrated his 45th birthday a few weeks before this scene.

Excerpted from: D-Day to Germany, 1944

From the series: Motion Picture Films Relating to the Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) and Commemorative Visits After the War, compiled 1944 - 1969Collection LIEB: Jack Lieb Collection, 1944 - 1969

Taken by newsreel cameraman Jack Lieb, this color home movie was donated by the Lieb family to the National Archives in 1984. You’ll see D-Day from a perspective different than the official military film or commercial newsreel. With his personal footage, Lieb takes the viewer through the preparations in England, where he spent time with war correspondents Ernie PyleJack Thompson, and Larry LaSueur, to the liberation of Paris and finally into Germany. Along the way, Lieb captured his experience on 16mm Kodachrome, filming everyday people in France and the occasional celebrity, such as Edward G. Robinson or Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway shows up around 26:45.)

Via The Unwritten Record » A Newsreel Cameraman’s View of D-Day

dont-please-stay-here
I would explain things to him (Dan Auerbach) in terms of colors and touchstone words," she says. "My word for the record was ‘fire,’ you know, blue fire, when a flame gets so hot it goes from red to blue. And I told him I wanted everything to sound like it was in the key of blue. And I think at first he was like, ‘What the fuck?’
Lana Del Rey for Rolling Stone (via dont-please-stay-here)